Former prime minister John Turner dies at 91

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Former prime minister John Turner, whose odyssey from a "Liberal dream in motion" to a political anachronism spanned 30 years, has died at the age of 91.
TORONTO --

Marc Kealey, a former aide speaking on behalf of Turner's relatives as a family friend, says Turner died peacefully in his sleep at home in Toronto on Friday night.

"He's in a much better place, and I can say on behalf of the family there was no struggle and it was very, very peaceful," Kealey said.

Politicians and other public figures immediately began sharing memories of Turner and expressing condolences to his family.

"A gifted politician, lawyer, and athlete, Mr. Turner became Canada's 17th Prime Minister after having served in numerous other capacities," Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in a written statement.

"Mr. Turner was a humble man with a strong social conscience. He supported many charitable organizations, including Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto. He was also an honorary director of World Wildlife Fund Canada and an ardent advocate for the protection of Canada's lakes and rivers."

Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole also offered his condolences, writing on Facebook, "Track star, lawyer, parliamentarian, but most importantly father and patriot, his contributions to Canada are profound and his legacy assured."

Former prime ministers Jean Chretien and Paul Martin both spoke of their one-time colleague's love of Parliament.

"More than anything, John was a House of Commons man and an outstanding public servant. He revered our democratic institutions like no other and served his constituents and Canada with great distinction. He will be greatly missed. My sincere condolences go out to his wife Geills and to his family," Chretien wrote.

Smart, athletic and blessed with movie-star good looks, Turner was dubbed "Canada's Kennedy" when he first arrived in Ottawa in the 1960s. But he failed to live up to the great expectations of his early career, governing for just 79 days after a difficult, decades-long climb to the top job.

"The most unfortunate thing to happen to anybody is to come in at the top in politics," Turner said in 1967.

"The…
The Canadian Press
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