Forehead scanners result in a large number of false, study warns

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Experts from the University of Portsmouth published a scientific article on the usefulness of thermometers which san a person's skin, mostly the forehead, to detect a fever.
Thermal screening to spot people infected with coronavirus is more reliable when scanning the eyeball and fingertip than taking body or forehead measurements.

Experts in human physiology published a scientific article on the usefulness of thermometers which scan a person's skin to detect a fever.

They say the current process is fundamentally flawed and produces a large number of false negatives, as well as some false positives, and also because not all people infected with the coronavirus develop a fever.

Taking two measurements from specific locations on the body with ample blood flow allows for a more reliable estimate of the true core body temperature and if it is elevated due to fever, the researchers believe.

A fever is defined as a temperature of greater than or equal to 100.4F (38°C) if spotted outside of a healthcare environment.

In healthcare settings, such as a hospital, a fever is technically defined as anything greater than or equal to 100.0F (37.8°C).

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Instead of using thermal technology on the forehead to gauge body temperature, the researchers say adapting the apparatus to get temperatures from the fingertip and eye would be a quick fix that has drastic improvements to reliability (pictured)

Using temperature scanners as a screening mechanism in offices, restaurants and at airports is unreliable and inaccurate, researchers have stated (stock photo)

Forehead-scanning thermometers have become ubiquitous as a way of detecting a fever, the most common symptom of coronavirus infection.

Instead of using thermal technology on the forehead to gauge body temperature, the researchers say adapting the apparatus to get temperatures from the fingertip and eye would be a quick fix that has drastic improvements to reliability.

Professor Mike Tipton from the University of Portsmouth, co-author of the research published in the journal Experimental Physiology, points to four major issues with the current scanners.

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