What happened when we bought the same seven products from eight supermarkets

www.dailypost.co.uk
6 min read
easy
Surprising price differences revealed
Whether you stick to Asda or Tesco, Morrisons or Sainsbury's, or float between Aldi and Lidl, prices vary.

Our shopping bills can in fact fluctuate wildly between these chains.

A reporter from the Manchester Evening News decided to buy the same seven items from eight big supermarkets to try to find out exactly what those price differences are.

READ MORE: UK's cheapest supermarket announced as chain narrowly beats close rival

These common products were Warburtons Toastie loaf, butter, beans, beef mince, eggs, Heinz Tomato Ketchup and Pringles.

You might be surprised at the results.

Please note that there were some little differences in the type of products as not every store had 5% fat mince available, but the majority are like for like.

With Aldi and Lidl not selling Heinz beans individually, we had to go for their own brands, but have adjusted the comparison accordingly.

(Image: Manchester Family / MEN)

It's only when you scrutinise products in this way that you see the slight differences to products that hit us all in the pocket. Like the packs of mince from the Co-op and Iceland being smaller than your typical 500g pack, at 450g and 425g respectively.

And who knew that large packs of Pringles come in different sizes? Every supermarket had 200g packs, except for Lidl, where the pack was 165g.

Not all products were in stock either - we're becoming quite accustomed to seeing empty shelves due to ongoing supply issues. Where items weren't available, we included the current prices anyway.

(Image: Manchester Family / MEN)

Perhaps unsurprisingly Aldi came out as being the cheapest, with the seven items costing £10.24. Tesco, which price matches many of Aldi's products, followed closely with a total of £10.61.

But what was surprising was the price difference to the most expensive, the Co-op, where the £14.35 bill was a staggering 40 per cent higher.

This was due in part to the most expensive Pringles of them all - at £3.30 for a tube, more than double…
Read full article