A city wrestled down an addiction crisis. Then came COVID-19

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As the COVID-19 pandemic killed more than a half-million Americans, it also quietly inflamed what was before it one of the country's greatest public health crises: addiction
HUNTINGTON, W. Va. -- Larrecsa Cox steered past the used tire shop, where a young man had collapsed a few days before, the syringe he'd used to shoot heroin still clenched in his fist.

She wound toward his house in the hills outside of town. The man had been revived by paramedics, and Cox leads a team with a mission of finding every overdose survivor to save them from the next one.

The road narrowed, and the man's mother stood in pink slippers in the rain to meet her. People have been dying all around her. Her nephew. Her neighbors. Then, almost, her son.

"People I've known all my life since I was born, it takes both hands to count them," she said. "In the last six months, they're gone."

As the COVID-19 pandemic killed more than a half-million Americans, it also quietly inflamed what was before it one of the country's greatest public health crises: addiction. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that more than 88,000 people died of drug overdoses in the 12 months ending in August 2020 — the latest figures available. That is the highest number of overdose deaths ever recorded in a year.

The devastation is an indictment of the public health infrastructure, which failed to fight the dueling crises of COVID-19 and addiction, said Dr. Michael Kilkenny, who runs the health department in Cabell County, including Huntington.

The pandemic drove those already in the shadows further into isolation, economic fragility and fear while at the same time upending the treatment and support systems that might save them. Simultaneously, Kilkenny said, disruptions in health care exacerbated the collateral consequences of injection drug use — HIV, hepatitis C, deadly bacterial infections that chew flesh to the bone and cause people in their 20s to have amputations and open-heart surgeries. There were 38 HIV infections tied to injection drug use last year in this county of fewer than 100,000 people — more than in 2019 in New York City.

Huntington was once…
CLAIRE GALOFARO AP National Writer
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