Accessibility in the Workplace: "Companies Don't Give Me a Fair Shot," says a Blind Developer

hackernoon.com
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An interview with a talented software developer who is also blind brings the reader into his world and helps us all see why accessibility matters.
Accessibility in the Workplace: "Companies Don't Give Me a Fair Shot," says a Blind Developer

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Nick (not his real name) is a talented developer in his 20s who is blind. At around 16 years old Nick lost all his sight. He started working as early as 15 years old as a software developer. This is his story. According to the World Health Organization, one billion people have moderate/severe vision impairment or blindness globally. It is projected that 2 million Americans will have severe visual impairment by 2050.

@ turbulence Amy Shah Multipotentialite reader and writer.

This article discusses the interview I had with Nick, a talented developer in his 20s who is blind.

According to the World Health Organization, one billion people have moderate/severe vision impairment or blindness globally. Similarly, according to the Centers for Disease Control website and Varma et al., approximately one million people were blind in 2015. It is projected that 2 million Americans will have severe visual impairment by 2050. Vision loss is one of the top 10 disabilities among adults ages 18 years old or older.

"My job title is dev ops engineer. I take on some of the toughest issues. It can be quite taxing and breaks are sometimes necessary." - Nick (not his real name)

I had the opportunity to chat with Nick, a talented young developer who is blind, about accessibility in the workplace for people with physical disabilities. Nick described his early life as having been somewhat positive as he had some sight during his childhood and teenage years. Nick had varying support from family but exhibited remarkable resilience throughout his childhood. Because of his vision impairment, he was not encouraged to play contact sports by his doctors or family members. This is something that he has regretted to this day.

Nick instead largely taught himself about computers during the time he would have spent on a sports team as a teenager. He studied extremely diligently and started…
Amy Shah
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