Ampere Roadmap Update: Switching to In-House CPU Designs, 128+ 5nm Cores in 2022

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Ampere Roadmap Update: Switching to In-House CPU Designs, 128+ 5nm Cores in 2022  AnandTechAmpere prepares to launch its first custom data center chips  TechCrunchAmpere Says Microsoft, Tencent Are Customers, Unveils New Design  BloombergAmpere aims to race ahead of Intel and AMD in low-power cloud processors  VentureBeatAmpere Submits Laudable Progress Report  EE TimesView Full Coverage on Google News
Today we're covering some news of the more unusual type, and that is a roadmap update from Ampere, and having a closer look what the company is planning in terms of architectural and microarchitectural choices of their upcoming next-generation server CPUs in 2022 and onwards.

For people not familiar with Ampere, the company was founded back in 2017 by former Intel president Renée James, notably built upon a group of former Intel engineers who had left along with her to the new adventure. Initially, the company had relied on IP and design talent from former AppliedMicro's X-Gene CPUs and still supporting legacy products such as the eMAG line-up.

With Arm having starting a more emphasised focus on designing and releasing datacentre and enterprise CPU IP line-ups in the form of the new Neoverse core offerings a few years back, over the last year or so we had finally seen the fruits of these efforts in the form of the release of several implementations of the first generation Neoverse N1 server CPU cores products, such as Amazon's Graviton2, and more importantly, Ampere's "Altra Quicksilver" 80-core server CPU.

The Altra Q line-up, for which we reviewed the flagship Q80-33 SKU last winter, was inarguably one of the most impressive Arm server CPU executions in past years, with the chip being able to keep up or beat the best AMD and Intel had to offer, even extending that positioning against the latest generation Xeon and EPYC generation.

Ampere's next generation "Mystique" Altra Max is the next product on the roadmap, and is targeted to be sampling in the next few months and released later this year. The design relies on the same first generation Arm Neoverse N1 cores, at the same maximum 250W TDP as a drop-in replacement on the same platform, however with an optimised implementation that now allows for up to 128 CPU cores – 60% more cores than the first iteration of Altra we have today, and double the amount of cores of competitor systems from AMD or Amazon's…
Andrei Frumusanu
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