As Vaccine Demand Slows, Political Differences Go on Display in California Counties

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fairly difficult
California officials are optimistic they can vaccinate millions more before hitting a hard wall of vaccine resistance.
Demand for covid vaccines is slowing across most of California, but as traffic at vaccination sites eases, the vaccination rates across the state are showing wide disparities.

In Santa Clara County, home to Silicon Valley, nearly 67% of residents 16 and older have had at least one dose as of Wednesday, compared with about 43% in San Bernardino County, east of Los Angeles. Statewide, about 58% of eligible residents have received at least one dose.

The differences reflect regional trends in vaccine hesitancy and resistance that researchers have been tracking for months, said Dean Bonner, associate survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California, a nonpartisan think tank.

In a PPIC survey released Wednesday, only 5% of respondents in the San Francisco Bay Area and 6% of those in Los Angeles said they wouldn't be getting vaccinated. But that share is 19% in the Inland Empire and 20% in the Central Valley.

"More urban areas might be hitting a wall, but their number of shots given is higher," said Bonner. "The rural areas might be hitting a wall maybe even before, but their shots given isn't quite as high."

Infectious disease experts estimate that anywhere from 50% to 85% of the population would need to get vaccinated to put a damper on the spread of the virus. But overall state numbers may mask pockets of unvaccinated Californians, concentrated inland, that will prevent these regions from achieving "herd immunity," the point at which the unvaccinated are protected by the vaccinated. Epidemiologists worry that the virus may continue to circulate in these communities, threatening everyone.

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The regional differences could be attributed, at least in part, to political opposition to the vaccine, said Bonner, as about 22% of Republicans and 17% of independents in the survey said they wouldn't be getting the vaccine, compared with 3% of Democrats.

But officials and epidemiologists see some…
Anna Almendrala
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