Bill de Blasio's class bias is showing with his ugly beach ban

nypost.com
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In 2013, Mayor de Blasio rode to Gracie Mansion with the theme of "A Tale of Two Cities," decrying New York City's class divide, ­between rich and poor, haves and have-nots. Seven years later, with…
In 2013, Mayor de Blasio rode to Gracie Mansion with the theme of "A Tale of Two Cities," decrying New York City's class divide, ­between rich and poor, haves and have-nots. Seven years later, with his threat to "pull" New Yorkers "right out" of the water should they dare go into the sea, Hizzoner has made clear which side of that divide he sits on.

I grew up in Brooklyn but didn't know there was a Prospect Park ­until I was a teen. You can draw a straight line through Brooklyn with the park as your divider. It's a different world beyond the park, and that world was mine. Growing up in Flatbush and then Bensonhurst, there was one place to go for summer amusement: the beach.

You'd take the B68 bus straight to Brighton, the subway to Coney Island or, if your family had a car, you could even drive to Manhattan Beach.

My family would pack a bag of food and mostly head to Brighton. We'd find a spot and lay out a sheet. Around us, a carnival of languages. Often, I'd befriend a child who, like me, didn't speak English. Sometimes, we'd stop by the ice-cream truck permanently stationed in front of the Shorefront Y. It's still there today.

Old ladies sat huddled on the boardwalk, scarves tied tight under their chins. Old men spat toasted sunflower seeds and played chess.

Along the…
Karol Markowicz
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