Foo Fighters' 'Medicine at Midnight': Album Review

variety.com
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When Dave Grohl described the new Foo Fighters album as "our 'Let's Dance'," referencing David Bowie's hit-heavy 1983 smash, fans of the rock band known for its raw, crusty assault of guitar riffs and fist-pounding rhythms may have found themselves somewhat flummoxed. The Foos have always been a big-sounding band with a bigger-sounding bang, and […]
When Dave Grohl described the new Foo Fighters album as "our 'Let's Dance'," referencing David Bowie's hit-heavy 1983 smash, fans of the rock band known for its raw, crusty assault of guitar riffs and fist-pounding rhythms may have found themselves somewhat flummoxed. The Foos have always been a big-sounding band with a bigger-sounding bang, and while melodically, Grohl can match the best pop writers of today and yesteryear, pivoting towards that cosmopolitan gloss is not a direction anyone might have predicted for the stalwarts of arena rock.

Yet here it is on "Medicine at Midnight," a blissfully concise 36 minutes of sprightly unabashed grooves led by a shaggy dog-eared leader who's always eager to tease. Helping the Foos realize its sonic goals on this tenth album in a little over 25 years is producer Greg Kurstin (Adele, Maren Morris), who guides its boyish, biggest-ever beats into soulful, singalong territory, as well as "Let's Dance" drummer-percussionist Omar Hakim, who appears liberally throughout "Medicine at Midnight."

Recorded before the pandemic, the collection oozes positivity in the form of gang vocals by a trio of female backup singers (among them: Barbara Gruska, of the Belle Brigade fame and a fellow badass drummer) even when touching on such lyrical themes as loneliness and shame. Guitarists Pat Smear, Chris Shiflett and Grohl himself, along with Taylor Hawkins…
A.D. Amorosi
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