Food waste: New UN report tries to measure what we throw away

www.csmonitor.com
3 min read
fairly difficult
Food waste is difficult to measure, but one U.N. report estimates it amounts to 17% of all food produced globally. By improving measurements, researchers hope to find solutions. "Improved measurement can lead to improved management," says one expert.
Instead of finishing your leftovers, you let them go bad and buy takeout.

It's a familiar routine for many – and indicative of habits that contribute to a global food waste problem that a new United Nations report says needs to be better measured so that it can be effectively addressed.

The U.N. report estimates 17% of the food produced globally each year is wasted. That amounts to 1.03 billion tons of food.

The waste is far more than previous reports had indicated, though direct comparisons are difficult because of differing methodologies and the lack of strong data from many countries.

"Improved measurement can lead to improved management," said Brian Roe, a food waste researcher at Ohio State University who was not involved in the report.

Most of the waste – or 61% – happens in households, while food service accounts for 26% and retailers account for 13%, the U.N. found. The U.N. is pushing to reduce food waste globally, and researchers are also working on an assessment of waste that includes the food lost before reaching consumers.

The authors note the report seeks to offer a clearer snapshot of the scale of a problem that has been difficult to assess, in hopes of spurring governments to invest in better tracking.

"Many countries haven't yet quantified their food waste, so they don't understand the scale of the problem," said…
Candice Choi
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