How Nobel winner David Card transformed economics

news.berkeley.edu
9 min read
fairly easy
The UC Berkeley professor of economics on why his research on the minimum wage, immigration and education was so controversial — and how it continues to be today
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On Monday, Oct. 11, labor economist and UC Berkeley professor of economics David Card won the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics. In this interview, Card talks with Berkeley News writer Edward Lempinen about why his research on the economics of the minimum wage, immigration and education was so controversial — and how it continues to be today.

Read a transcript of Berkeley Voices episode #87: "How Nobel winner David Card transformed economics."

[Music: "TwoPound" by Blue Dot Sessions]

Intro: On Monday, Oct. 11, David Card, a labor economist and professor of economics at UC Berkeley, won the 2021 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences.

He won for the work that he started in the 1990s on the economics of the minimum wage, immigration and education. These are high-profile issues, always at the center of policy conflicts in the U.S. Card was awarded half the prize. The other half was shared by economists Joshua Angrist of MIT and Guido Imbens of Stanford University.

In 1995, Card and his colleague Alan Krueger of Princeton University published the book, Myth and Measurement: The New Economics of the Minimum Wage. That same year, Card won the Clark Prize from the American Economic Association. The prize is given to economists under the age of 40 who make major contributions to the field. It's very prestigious.

This is Berkeley Voices. I'm Anne Brice.

[Music fades]

Today, I'm joined by a colleague of mine, Edward Lempinen. He's a writer in UC Berkeley's Office of Communications and Public Affairs. He covers economics and public policy, among several other topics.

Hi Ed, thanks for joining me today on Berkeley Voices.

Edward Lempinen: Hi, Anne. Thanks for having me. It's good to be here.

Anne Brice: So, you have been talking to Professor Card a lot this past week. And I'm wondering if you have learned anything about him and his work that has surprised you?

Edward Lempinen: I think that there are…
Anne Brice
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