How to comprehend terrorism?

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By Sudhanshu Tripathi How to comprehend terrorism? Because the issue is concerned with the very existence or survival of the human race as the continuing gory violence or such brutal acts particularly
By Sudhanshu Tripathi

How to comprehend terrorism? Because the issue is concerned with the very existence or survival of the human race as the continuing gory violence or such brutal acts particularly in the present age of nuclear weapons, cyber warfare and bio-weapons may create a situation where no one can survive. Why is this change in the present times? This needs to be carefully understood by uncovering or penetrating into the inner core of the terrorism. In fact, terrorism is a kind of large-scale organised violence aimed at challenging the very might of the state but that does not explain its real meaning because terrorism is not an ordinary crime. As such terrorism continues to evolve as an agenda of brutal cruelty or savagery targeting its distant goals rather than immediate victims leading to wider repercussions in the world.

Indeed terrorism is an exceptionally complex matter that human beings continue to encounter. The danger is that without skill in dealing with its complexities, one will drastically oversimplify the phenomenon. In fact, the extent to which empirical analysis of terrorism be approached as art or a science may be a hotly debated issue. If it is considered a science there are few important differences between those who seek to emulate the natural sciences like physics and chemistry, and those who believe that the study of human beings is inherently different from the study of nature in its non-human manifestations like terrorism.

Those who hold the second view argue that one cannot really grasp a human action unless one can understand its subjective meaning: what it means to the person like a terrorist who commits it and what that person is intended by it, and so on. As regards pure science, an atomic particle does not intend anything; what it does has no subjective meaning to the physicist because Physics does well as a science by describing activity in purely external, physical terms. But can the phenomenon of terrorism be…
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