How to Stop Your Phone From Overheating

lifehacker.com
4 min read
easy
A hot iPhone or Android can be a hassle; here's how to cool things down.
We've all been there; you're using your iPhone or Android, when suddenly, you notice that it's getting a little warm. A little warm soon transitions to a little hot, then very hot, to a concerning degree. You might think, "Should my phone be so hot it hurts to use?" No, it should not. Here's what to do if your phone is overheating—and how to stop it from doing so in the first place.

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Why do smartphones heat up?

Your smartphone, like all computers, generates heat as it works. That's usually fine; the problem comes when there's too much heat in the picture. To avoid damaging the internal components of your device, the system is designed to take preventative measures when overheating to cool itself down.

This involves reducing the maximum display brightness (which is why you see your phone start to dim as it overheats); slowing down the processor, so your phone feels more sluggish; and, if it comes to it, locking itself up. In that case, you'll see a message warning you that your phone is too hot, and it needs to cool down before you can continue to use it.

Because there's a built-in system for cooling down your phone, you don't need to worry about overheating issues leading to anything catastrophic, like an exploding battery. But frequent overheating is annoying and not normal. Let's explore some situations where your phone might overheat, and what you can do about it.

Take it out of the sun

One of the most common reasons that your phone heats up is the same reason you heat up while lying out on the beach: the sun. Direct sunlight is terrible for your phone's temperature management. The black mirror that is your phone's display takes in all that direct sunlight, and rapidly heats up. The whole device becomes very hot to the touch, the display gets very dim, and, pretty soon, the OS will lock you out.

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The only solution here is to simply not use your phone in direct sunlight—or even in a hot environment, if you can help it. If…
Jake Peterson
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