I'm a Doctor and Here's How You're Ruining Your Vision

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fairly easy
You're staring at a screen right now. And chances are, you don't know the 1 thing you can do to protect your eyes while doing so. That's why we wrote this...
You're staring at a screen right now. And chances are, you don't know the #1 thing you can do to protect your eyes while doing so. That's why we wrote this. The truth is that the power is within your sights—diet, lifestyle choices and good eye hygiene have a lot to do with preserving vision as we age. Eat This, Not That! Health asked top eye experts about the unexpected ways we might be damaging our vision every day. Here's what they said you should focus on. Read on, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had Coronavirus.

1

You're Getting Too Much Sun

young african american woman smiling and looking up

"Regardless of where we live or the time of year, sun overexposure is an ever-present danger to our eye health," says Trevor Elmquist, DO, a board-certified ophthalmologist and founder of Elmquist Eye Group in Florida. "We all know about the importance of sunscreen, but many don't consider the harmful effects of UV rays on our eyes."

The Rx: "Make an effort to wear wide-brimmed hats, UV-blocking contact lenses and close-fitting, UV-blocking sunglasses to protect your eyes and prevent long-term damage," says Elmquist. When shopping for sunglasses, check the label, and only buy shades that block 99 percent of both UVA and UVB radiation.

2

You're Not Eating An Anti-Inflammatory Diet

Man hold useful bunch of spinach in hand closeup on kitchen background

"Diet plays a surprising role in vision health, both helping and harming," says Lisa Richards, a nutritionist and author of The Candida Diet. "Refined and processed foods have inflammatory effects in the body, including the eyes. Chronic inflammation can be damaging to the eyes and cause poor vision."

The Rx: Ground your diet in lean protein, healthy fats and the full color spectrum of fruits and vegetables. "We should seek to 'eat the rainbow' for more than just our general wellness, but our eye health as well," says Richards. "Fruits and vegetables,…
Michael Martin
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