Indigenous People's Day is a federal holiday now. Activists want to drop Columbus Day

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This year marks the first time a U.S. president has officially proclaimed an Indigenous Peoples' Day observance. But not every state or city broadly recognizes this day in honor of Native Americans.
Indigenous People's Day is a federal holiday now. Activists want to drop Columbus Day



AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Today is Indigenous Peoples' Day and recognized for the first time in a U.S. presidential proclamation. President Biden said he wants to honor Native Americans and their contributions to American society, along with the brutal history of discrimination and genocide against them. He also issued a proclamation to still recognize today as Columbus Day, a federal holiday since 1937. And that joint recognition of Christopher Columbus's legacy comes with significant tension.

DYLAN BACA: Should we recognize a man who raped, killed children, killed women, decimated the Native American population here?

CORNISH: That's Dylan Baca, a 19-year-old Arizona activist who co-founded the Indigenous Peoples Initiative. He told NPR's Emma Bowman his group had been, among others, working with the White House to help draft President Biden's proclamation on today's observance. Not every city or state has to observe a federal holiday, and some may still not observe Indigenous Peoples' Day. Others are choosing to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples' Day, say Oregon. State…
Ashley Brown,Lauren Hodges,Emma Bowman
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