Intel Core i7-10700 vs Core i7-10700K Review: Is 65W Comet Lake an Option?

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fairly easy
Article URL: https://www.anandtech.com/show/16343/intel-core-i710700-vs-core-i710700k-review-is-65w-comet-lake-an-option Comments URL: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=25860191 Points: 1 # Comments: 0
Over the years, Intel's consumer processor lineup has featured its usual array of overclocking 'K' models, and more recently the 'F' series that come without integrated graphics. The bulk of the lineup however are still the versions without a suffix, the 'nones', like the Core i7-10700 in this review. These processors sit in the middle of the road, almost always having a 65 W TDP compared to the 91-125 W overclockable models, but also having integrated graphics, unlike the F family. What makes it interesting is when we pair one of these 65 W parts against its 125 W overclocking counterpart, and if the extra base and turbo frequency boost is actually worth the money in an era where motherboards don't seem to care about power?

Intel's Core i7-10700 at 65 W: Is It Really 65 W?

The understanding of the way that Intel references its TDP (thermal design point) values has gone through a mini-revolution in the last few years. We have had an almost-decade of quad-core processors at around 90 W and 65 W, and most of them would never reached these numbers even under turbo modes - for example, the Core i5-6600K was rated at 91 W, but peak power draw was only 83 W. This has been the norm for a while, until recently when Intel had to start boosting the core count. As we have slowly gone up in core count, from 4 to 6 to 8 and now 10, these numbers have seemed almost arbitrary for a while.

The reason comes down to what TDP really is. In the past, we used to assume that it was the peak power consumption of the processor was its TDP rating – after all, a 'thermal design point' of a processor was almost worthless if you didn't account for the peak power dissipation. What makes Intel's situation different (or confusing, depending on how you want to call it) is that the company defines its TDP in the context of a 'base' frequency. The TDP will be the maximum power under a sustained workload for which the base frequency is the minimum frequency guarantee. Intel defines a sustained…
Dr. Ian Cutress
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