iOS 15 should be tailored to make the iPhone 12 Pro more pro

www.cnet.com
5 min read
easy
Commentary: It's time for Apple's "pro" phones to get software that actually makes them more professional.
WWDC 2021

WWDC21 starts Monday June 7 at 10 a.m. PT and Apple is expected to preview the next versions of iOS and iPadOS (likely called iOS 15 and iPadOS 15), I hope the new software for the iPhone 12 Pro, 12 Pro Max and the pro models for the rumored iPhone 13 lineup will have more pro features. Currently, aside from the word "pro," what differentiates a regular iPhone from a "pro" model is the price, stainless steel sides, different finishes and hardware features like additional RAM, a telephoto camera and a lidar sensor that helps with Portrait mode photos, autofocus in low-light environments and AR.

The next iteration of iOS needs more advanced features and settings designed solely for pro iPhone models. This would not only target a more savvy user, but also provide a clearer differentiation between a regular iPhone and a pro one. And the iPhone 12 Pro Max with its 6.7-inch display needs even more software features that take advantage of its large screen.

Read more: WWDC 2021: How to watch Apple's big iOS 15 event from home June 7-11

In 2011 when Steve Jobs introduced the iPad 2 he said, "It is in Apple's DNA that technology alone is not enough. It's technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the results that make our heart sing. And no where is that more true than in these post-PC devices."

Apple

Ten years later, Apple is still at that metaphorical intersection of technology and liberal arts, but it's no longer the nice tidy corner Jobs presented. Models in the iPhone 12 lineup are incredibly similar with the 12 Pro Max being an outlier. Other devices like the new M1-chip iPad Pro share a significant Venn-diagram overlap with Apple's MacBook laptop line. By all accounts, the iPad Pro walks like a Mac and quacks like a Mac, but it doesn't behave like one. Despite its "pro" hardware it still…
Patrick Holland
Read full article