Moccasin brand apologizes for making the shoes because it isn't a Native American-owned business

www.dailymail.co.uk
26 min read
fairly difficult
Minnetonka issued a statement Monday admitting the company had made money off the back of its appropriation of Native American culture.
A Minnesota-based shoe firm has apologized for making moccasins because it is not owned by Native Americans, who pioneered the design of the traditional footwear.

Popular brand Minnetonka issued a statement Monday admitting the company had made money through 'appropriation' of Native American culture over the last 75 years.

'We deeply and meaningfully apologize for having benefited from selling Native-inspired designs without directly honoring Native culture or communities,' the statement read.

Minnetonka, which has been making its popular shoes since 1964, timed the apology to coincide with Indigenous Peoples' Day.

Minnetonka President Jori Miller Sherer, Reconciliation Adviser Adrienne Benjamin and CEO David Miller (from left to right)

Minnesota-based shoe firm Minnetonka has apologized for making moccasins despite not being owned by Native Americans, who pioneered the design of the traditional footwear

CEO David Miller said was issuing the statement to acknowledge that the company is not a Native-owned business, and said he promised to do more to support Indigenous communities in the future.

Miller explained that the company first publicly conceded its use of Native culture in the summer of 2020, and added that he now wanted to make a public apology.

Cultural appropriation is the term used to describe when person or group adopts visual elements of an often-persecuted ethnicity's identity without acknowledging it. It has become a hot-button issue in recent years.

White people wearing traditionally-black hairstyles like cornrow braids, or people dressing in Native American headgear, or as Mexican Dia De Muertos figures for Halloween have all sparked anger.

Critics of that outrage say people accused of cultural appropriation are often 'appreciating' other aspects of a culture, and not mocking it.

'We first publicly acknowledged our appropriation in the summer of 2020, but it was long overdue,' Miller said in his apology.

'While Minnetonka has evolved…
Associated, Rachel Sharp, By Associated Press Rachel Sharp For Dailymail.com
Read full article