Mulberry Bend: New York's Original Back Alley

infamousnewyork.com
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A maze of back alleys and hidden passageways, the Mulberry Bend on Mulberry Street was a gathering place for generations of New York's underworld. From the Dead Rabbits to the Gambino Crime Family,…
Address: Mulberry Street Between Worth and Bayard Streets

Status: Partially Demolished in 1897 Now Columbus Park

A maze of back alleys and hidden passageways, the Mulberry Bend on Mulberry Street was a gathering place for generations of New York's underworld. From the Dead Rabbits to the Gambino Crime Family, the Bend's horrific conditions served as an incubator for the gangs of New York. Today, only a tiny sliver of this infamous neighborhood still exists.

According to 19th century social reformer Jacob Riis:

"Where Mulberry street crooks like an elbow within hail of the old depravity of the Five Points, is "the Bend" foul core of New York's slums."–Jacob Riis, How the Other Half Lives

Mulberry Street was the aorta that pumped life though the slums of the Five Points. Located between Worth and Bayard Streets, The Mulberry Bend was a place where the poorest of the poor scrambled to survive. A home for the unwanted and unwelcome, the street existed as a multi-racial, multi ethnic, polyglot community, unplanned and predating the city's grid system.

From Country Lane to Urban Slum

In the days before the American Revolution, the street was named for a grove of Mulberry trees on the banks of the Collect Pond, one of Manhattan's freshwater reservoirs. The Pond's marshlands forced engineers to route the country lane in a west to east bend, which would become Mulberry Bend.

By 1810, Mulberry Street became urbanized. Heavy industry congregated around the Collect Pond. Slaughterhouses, potters and blacksmiths choked the shores of the Collect, while raw sewage from the slums of Mulberry Street ran into the water, transforming the pond into a polluted bog.

In 1817 the City Council drained the pond by digging a canal, which still runs under Canal Street…
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