North Carolina is Getting Another Seat in Congress. Here's How To Make Sure We Can Do Something With It

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The U.S. Census Bureau recently released the results of last year's Census and shared the news that my home state of North Carolina will be getting a 14th seat in Congress.
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The U.S. Census Bureau recently released the results of last year's Census and shared the news that my home state of North Carolina will be getting a 14th seat in Congress. It's a welcome bit of news that we'll soon have another voice in Washington, D.C., but more importantly, it provides an opportunity to re-evaluate what exactly it is we want from our representatives in Washington and how they can finally take meaningful action to help the people they represent.

It's no surprise that Washington isn't particularly productive; simply put, Americans are fed up with Congress. Approval ratings are consistently below 30 percent, and, despite a bump earlier this year, those numbers are dropping once again. People are tired of the partisan fights, the exhausting and ineffective lack of action, and the feeling that their interests aren't really being heard on Capitol Hill.

A lot of those problems can be tied back to one thing: party primaries. Turnout in these elections is infamously low, and generally only attracts voters who are most in-line with the party's platform. But, given how many seats are safe or uncontested – more than 80 percent of House districts are currently considered safe for one party or the other – the party primary is the deciding race (which means the general election doesn't matter). So, if we want Congress to start legislating for all constituents and not just the people voting in party primaries, it's time for change.

In my home state of North Carolina, this is especially apparent. Voters need to register as a member of…
Katlyn Batts
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