On The Trail: Texas underscores Democrats' struggle with voter turnout | TheHill

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A special election to replace the late Rep. Ron Wright (R-Texas) will conclude with a runoff between two leading Republicans after a low-turnout all-party primary between 23 candidates ended with the leading Democratic contender falling just short of second place.
A special election to replace the late Rep. Ron Wright Ron WrightThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - Biden sales pitch heads to Virginia and Louisiana GOP's Wright, Ellzey advance to runoff in Texas special election Susan Wright advances to runoff in Texas special election MORE (R-Texas) will conclude with a runoff between two leading Republicans after a low-turnout all-party primary between 23 candidates ended with the leading Democratic contender falling just short of second place.

For Democrats, the results serve to underscore a lesson they say they learned the hard way in 2020, one that could decide which party wins control of the House of Representatives in next year's midterm elections: They have to start showing up.

The final results show that Susan Wright, a Republican activist and the late congressman's widow, will face state Rep. Jake Ellzey (R) in a runoff election to be scheduled by Gov. Greg Abbott (R).

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Jana Lynne Sanchez, the best-funded Democrat who lost to Ron Wright in 2018, finished 354 votes behind Ellzey.

It is the latest disappointment for Democrats who are perpetually hopeful of a breakthrough in the nation's second-largest state, especially in a suburban and exurban area that former President Trump Donald TrumpFacebook Oversight Board to rule on Trump ban Wednesday Rubio keeping door open on White House bid Lincoln Project taunts Trump, saying he lost to 'swamp,' McConnell MORE carried by just 3 percentage points in 2020.

Democrats did not pin their hopes on the district, a seat with a footprint in the Dallas metroplex that their party has not controlled since Phil Gramm became a Republican in 1983. No national Democratic groups or allies spent money on behalf of any of the 10 Democrats in the contest.

"Republican groups poured hundreds of thousands of dollars into a Republican seat to…
Reid Wilson
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