Problem Statement Framing - Product Mindset - Medium

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fairly easy
"If I had an hour to solve a problem I'd spend 55 minutes thinking about the problem and 5 minutes thinking about solutions." — Albert Einstein A problem statement is a concise description of an…
Einstein's Problem Definition tools

1. Rephrase the Problem

When a Toyota executive asked employees to brainstorm "ways to increase their productivity", all he got back were blank stares. When he rephrased his request as "ways to make their jobs easier", he could barely keep up with the number of suggestions.

Words carry strong implicit meaning and, as such, play a major role in how we perceive a problem. In the example above, 'be productive' might seem like a sacrifice you're doing for the company, while 'make your job easier' may be more like something you're doing for your own benefit, but from which the company also benefits. In the end, the problem is still the same, but the feelings — and the points of view — associated with each of them are vastly different.

2. Expose and Challenge Assumptions

Every problem — no matter how apparently simple it may become with a long list of assumptions attached. Many of these assumptions may be inaccurate and could make your problem statement inadequate or even misguided.

The first step to getting rid of bad assumptions is to make them explicit. Write a list and expose as many assumptions as you can — especially those that may seem the most obvious and 'untouchable'.

That, in itself, brings more clarity to the problem at hand. But go further and test each assumption for validity: think in ways that might not be valid and their consequences. What you will find may surprise you: that many of those bad assumptions are self-imposed — with just a bit of scrutiny you are able to safely drop them.

For example, suppose you're about to enter the restaurant business. One of your assumptions might be 'restaurants have a menu. While such an assumption may seem true at first, try challenging it and maybe you'll find some very interesting business models (such as one restaurant in which customers bring dish ideas for the chef to cook, for example).

3. Chunk Up

Each problem is a small piece of a greater problem. In the same way…
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