Republican leaders ask Michigan election board to delay certification of results, in latest GOP effort to cast doubt on the vote

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fairly difficult
Democratic officials are considering their legal options to compel certification.
"This board faces a stark choice," the letter reads, citing claims of "numerical anomalies" and "procedural irregularities" that they say would leave "the distrust and sense of procedural disenfranchisement felt by many Michigan voters to fester for years" if ignored by the board.

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The letter has increased worries among state Democratic leaders that Republicans may block certification Monday. They have begun drafting legal documents and detailed contingency plans in the event the board fails to certify. Among the options being considered is for Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) to replace the GOP members using her executive authority, or to ask a judge to compel the board to certify the results, said a current and former Democratic official, speaking on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly on this matter.

"There is absolutely no legal basis for the Republican canvassers to abandon their responsibility to certify the general election result — that was a fair, free and secure election — as required by statute," Christine Greig, Michigan's House Democratic leader, said in a statement Friday. She said the delays in declaring the results official — particularly those related to vote counting in Detroit — are rooted in racism and could be a "stunt" to influence selection of the state's presidential electors.

McDaniel and Cox's demand for scrutiny is entirely focused on the election results in Wayne County, Michigan's largest and most Democratic county, which includes Detroit.

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Detroit election officials and Democratic lawyers dispute the accounts of widespread irregularities.

Wayne County officials have noted discrepancies in the vote count in a number of precincts. But they said the size of the errors was small — a difference of one or two votes per precinct, affecting a total of about 450 votes. Biden leads the state by about 150,000 votes.

In a tweet Friday, Michigan's Democratic secretary of state suggested an…
Kayla Ruble, Tom Hamburger, David Fahrenthold
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