Review, usage and repair of the Framework laptop

yeokhengmeng.com
9 min read
fairly easy
I finally received the Framework laptop, said by many to be one of the most repairable and modular laptops made so far. Tons of professional reviewers and Youtubers have already given their opinions and made teardown videos. Instead of mimicking what has already been done, I decided to put myself in the shoes of an ordinary layman and share my thoughts from a personal usability perspective.
I finally received the Framework laptop, said by many to be one of the most repairable and modular laptops made so far.

Tons of professional reviewers and Youtubers have already given their opinions and made teardown videos. Instead of mimicking what has already been done, I decided to put myself in the shoes of an ordinary layman and share my thoughts from a personal usability perspective.

Overview of the Framework laptop

For those unaware what the FW laptop is about, let me not reinvent the wheel and hereby point you to a video made by iFixit.

The basic idea is this, the FW laptop is designed with the main goals of being modular and repairable. This is backed by iFixit giving it an uncommon 10/10 perfect score in repairability as shown in the video.

If any part of the system breaks or a future upgrade is desired, it should be relatively easy for the customer to replace the component on their own.

The only fixed external port is the headphone jack. The others like USB-C, USB-A, HDMI, microSD, Displayport and more are up to the customer to customise either at the point of purchase or even years down the road through the use of detachable modular expansion cards.

The reference design files for the modular expansion cards have been released by Framework on Github so third-parties can easily build customised variants in future.

My purchase specification

To save on costs and not really needing extreme performance, I chose the bare minimum option available which was the DIY edition with the cheapest Intel i5 CPU option instead of the pre-built one.

Intel i5-1135G7 (8M Cache, up to 4.20 GHz)

Integrated Iris Xe Graphics

13.5" 3:2 2256x1504 Glossy Display

1080p 60fps camera

Fingerprint reader (on power button)

Intel Wi-Fi 6E AX210 No vPro (This is optional but I ordered it)

3.5mm combo headphone jack

Expansion Cards 1x USB-A 1x MicroSD 1x HDMI 2x USB-C

I ordered an extra USB-C expansion card as a backup as the laptop uses USB-C as a charging port too.

I…
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