Staying Out of Your Lane

creatingvalue.substack.com
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Image by David Mark from Pixabay Anyone who has ever got a mortgage loan probably knows that when things go wrong, they tend to go wrong at the point of handing off responsibility. You've been working with a single contact for a while, and they've often built up a lot of context on your exact situation and what you need, and the time comes for the next person in the process to take over and everything suddenly breaks; suddenly all the knowns about your situation flip back over to being unknowns and everything that was going along swimmingly before comes to a grinding halt.
Image by David Mark from Pixabay

Anyone who has ever got a mortgage loan probably knows that when things go wrong, they tend to go wrong at the point of handing off responsibility. You've been working with a single contact for a while, and they've often built up a lot of context on your exact situation and what you need, and the time comes for the next person in the process to take over and everything suddenly breaks; suddenly all the knowns about your situation flip back over to being unknowns and everything that was going along swimmingly before comes to a grinding halt.

People can generally do the jobs they were hired to do, but when the time comes to give their task over to the next person in the chain, communications are often speed bumps; even where everything the next party needs to know is communicated correctly, the communication itself takes time. And the hand-off itself isn't without costs; the simple process of a job being sent to the next person who then notices and begins work on the task can take days in some cases.

Clipboard Health has talked a bit before about flexibility in hiring, particularly as it relates to being flexible with titles. There, we were focusing more on the idea that titles sometimes got in the way of getting the right people for the job, or that the titles sometimes created a bit of an artificial barrier to individual growth for the person you hired, keeping their growth confined to the size and shape they and the company perceive the title indicates that the job has. Here we are talking about something different - the idea that a title often constrains job responsibilities to exclude tasks and functions it might otherwise make sense to include.

This often happens because - since job titles tend to exist at multiple companies - jobs are often reduced to the common denominators between companies. A business analyst can become someone who only deals in SQL and Tableau, with nothing else allowed or required. Even if that wasn't…
Ben Denny
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