Study confirms climate change impacted Hurricane Florence's precipitation and size

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A study led by Kevin Reed, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) at Stony Brook University, and published in Science Advances, found that Hurricane Florence produced more extreme rainfall and was spatially larger due to human-induced climate change.
Kevin Reed, PhD, Professor in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University uses a forecast attribution model to determine the effect of climate change on extreme storms. Credit: Stony Brook University

A study led by Kevin Reed, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) at Stony Brook University, and published in, found that Hurricane Florence produced more extreme rainfall and was spatially larger due to human-induced climate change.

Previous research has suggested that human influences such as emission of greenhouse gasses that alter climate does affect precipitation in extreme storms. The research in this study, however, is a first to use a "forecast attribution" framework that enables scientists to investigate the effect of climate change on individual storm events days in advance.

Changes in extreme weather are one of the most serious ways society experiences the impact of climate change. Severe weather and natural disasters account for much damage and has a major economic impact on countries. Reed and colleagues nationally are investigating ways to better forecast extreme storms in the…
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