Sunday Reading: Hiroshima

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From The New Yorker's archive: John Hersey's celebrated work, and a selection of related articles.
This week marks the seventy-fifth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima. In 1946, William Shawn, who was then the deputy to Harold Ross, the editor of The New Yorker, asked John Hersey to travel to Japan and write about the horrific aftermath. Hersey's report, "Hiroshima," marked a radical departure from the conventional journalism of the day. In clear and supple prose, he described incomprehensible destruction on a human level. Hersey focussed on six survivors. ("Each knows that in the act of survival he lived a dozen lives and saw more death than he ever thought he would see.") The magazine devoted its entire August 31st issue to the piece, and it was soon being read all over the world. Seventy-four years later, we're bringing you Hersey's…
The New Yorker
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