The GoPro-ification of the iPhone

techcrunch.com
6 min read
fairly easy
Hello friends, and welcome back to Week in Review! Last week, we talked about some sunglasses from a company that many people do not like very much. This week, we're talking about Apple and the company 1,600 times smaller than it that's facing similar product problems. If you're reading this on the TechCrunch site, you […]
Hello friends, and welcome back to Week in Review!

Last week, we talked about some sunglasses from a company that many people do not like very much. This week, we're talking about Apple and the company 1,600 times smaller than it that's facing similar product problems.

If you're reading this on the TechCrunch site, you can get this in your inbox from the newsletter page, and follow my tweets @lucasmtny

the big thing

When you get deep enough into the tech industry, it's harder to look at things with a consumer's set of eyes. I've felt that way more and more after six years watching Apple events as a TechCrunch reporter, but sometimes memes from random Twitter accounts help me find the consumer truth I'm looking for.

As that dumb little tweet indicates, Apple is charging toward a future where it's becoming a little harder to distinguish new from old. The off-year "S" period of old is no more for the iPhone, which has seen tweaks and new size variations since 2017's radical iPhone X redesign. Apple is stretching the periods between major upgrades for its entire product line and it's also taking longer to roll out those changes.

Apple debuted the current bezel-lite iPad Pro design back in late 2018 and it's taken three years for the design to work its way down to the iPad mini while the entry-level iPad is still lying in wait. The shift from M1 Macs will likely take years as the company has already detailed. Most of Apple's substantial updates rely on upgrades to the chipsets that they build, something that increasingly makes them look and feel like a consumer chipset company.

This isn't a new trend, or even a new take, it's been written lots of times, but it's particularly interesting as the company bulks up the number of employees dedicated to future efforts like augmented reality, which will one day soon likely replace the iPhone.

It's an evolution that's pushing them into a similar design territory as action camera darling GoPro, which has struggled again…
Lucas Matney
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