The 'Loki' Premiere Recap: Time Is Not on His Side

www.theringer.com
8 min read
standard
The first episode of the series introduces the Time Variance Authority and kicks off a journey of literal self-discovery that could have major implications for the rest of the Marvel Cinematic Universe
Near the end of the Loki series premiere, the show's titular God of Mischief is plotting his escape from the Time Variance Authority as he searches for the Tesseract, the powerful tool he used to bring an alien invasion to Earth and evade eventual imprisonment on Asgard (inadvertently breaking off into a new timeline in the process). Surely it could help him escape his new captors at the TVA, too.

After threatening a poor TVA desk worker named Casey to reveal its whereabouts, Loki finds the Tesseract sitting idly in a desk drawer, beside an assortment of loose Infinity Stones and other trinkets. "Infinity Stones?" Loki asks Casey, shocked. "How ... how do you have these?"

"Oh, we actually got a lot of those," Casey responds casually. "Yeah, some of the guys use them as paper weights."

After refusing to believe everything he'd been told about the TVA and its duty to protect something called the "Sacred Timeline," Loki finally understands that he's in perhaps the most powerful place in the entire multiverse. After Marvel spent a decade building up those shiny MacGuffins as paramount, Loki renders them useless in a single scene. The rewriting of our understanding of the MCU has begun.

Following the mixed success of two shows that cast former sidekicks and supporting characters into the spotlight in WandaVision and The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, Loki features a former villain and antihero as the main attraction. Following in those series' footsteps, the six-episode series, directed by Kate Herron, brings Tom Hiddleston's beloved Prince of Asgard back to life to take a look at his, and the MCU's, past. But the show also looks ahead to a bigger, stranger future. The stakes are higher than ever—the planetary conquests of Thanos suddenly seem trivial when branching timelines and the entire multiverse are in jeopardy.

In "Glorious Purpose," Loki faces the hard truth that he is not "burdened with glorious purpose" after all, but rather that he has no real purpose…
Daniel Chin
Read full article