The World Might Soon Wake Up to a Far-Left Government in Germany

www.nationalreview.com
6 min read
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A far-left coalition government appears to be the probable outcome of the German elections later this month, posing threats to NATO and fiscal responsibility.
Social Democratic Party's main candidate Olaf Scholz poses for a photo near a board reading "Scholz tackles it" after an election campaign event in Goettingen, Germany, September 4, 2021. (Jens Schlueter/Pool via Reuters)

Fiscal responsibility and commitment to the transatlantic alliance are on the line.

The clock is ticking down on political campaigns in Germany, as the general elections are scheduled for September 26. In a little over a week, Chancellor Angela Merkel's reign comes to an end after 16 years.

Germans are presented with a very simple choice. One option is a so-called moderate government led by the conservatives (CDU/CSU) in alliance with the Greens and the Free Democrats (FDP). The other option is an administration headed by the center-left Social Democrats (SPD) in coalition with the Greens and the Left Party.

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After a weeklong battle in April between Markus Söder, the leader of Bavaria's Christian Social Union (CSU), and Armin Laschet, the head of the Christian Democratic Union, Germany's conservatives placed their bet on Laschet, a Merkel-like left-leaning centrist, as their candidate for chancellor, instead of on his more popular Bavarian rival. The coalition's establishment, which strongly pushed for Laschet, ignored the dramatically grim polls and prevailed over the conservatives' base, which overwhelmingly favored Söder.

Now they are paying the price for this decision on Election Day, likely resulting in the worst CDU result since the Second World War, as the CDU has fallen dramatically in the polls in recent weeks.

The most recent polls show only 19 percent of voters planning to back the CDU, with the SPD in first place at 25 percent, followed by the Greens at 17 percent, Free Democratic Liberals at 13 percent, Alternative for Germany at 11 percent, and the Left Party at 7 percent.

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If indeed the SPD wins this election, it would have three options to form a government, but only two are…
Andreas Hellmann
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