US resorts adapt to new normal of skiing amid pandemic

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DENVER (AP) — Helmet, goggles, skis? Check. Hand sanitizer, face covering, reservation? Check. Roughly seven months after the coronavirus cut the ski season short at the height of spring...
FILE - In this May 27, 2020, file photo, a skier wears a face covering while negotiating the slope at the reopening of Arapahoe Basin Ski Resort, which closed in mid-March to help in the effort to stop the spread of the new coronavirus, in Keystone, Colo. Roughly seven months after the coronavirus cut the ski season short at the height of spring break, resorts across the U.S. and Canada are slowly picking up the pieces and figuring out how to safely reopen this winter. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)

FILE - In this May 27, 2020, file photo, a skier wears a face covering while negotiating the slope at the reopening of Arapahoe Basin Ski Resort, which closed in mid-March to help in the effort to stop the spread of the new coronavirus, in Keystone, Colo. Roughly seven months after the coronavirus cut the ski season short at the height of spring break, resorts across the U.S. and Canada are slowly picking up the pieces and figuring out how to safely reopen this winter. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)

DENVER (AP) — Helmet, goggles, skis? Check. Hand sanitizer, face covering, reservation? Check.

Roughly seven months after the coronavirus cut the ski season short at the height of spring break, resorts across the United States and Canada are slowly picking up the pieces and figuring out how to safely reopen this winter. While many of the details are still being worked out, resort leaders are asking guests to curb their expectations and to embrace a new normal while skiing and snowboarding amid a pandemic.

That could mean wearing masks, standing 6 feet (1.8 meters) apart in lift lines (about the length of a typical ski), no dine-in service, riding lifts only with your group and no large gatherings for an apres drink.

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"We're very optimistic about skiing this winter," said Dave Byrd, director of risk and regulatory affairs at the Colorado-based National Ski Areas Association. "The fact that we ski outside in ultraviolet sun and in the wind, and it's…
Thomas Peipert
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