What happens next in the impeachment of President Trump?

www.washingtonpost.com
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Trump could soon be the first president in history to be impeached twice. The House voted to impeach him in December 2019. In January 2020, the Senate acquitted him after a relatively quick trial.
Interpretation of the news based on evidence, including data, as well as anticipating how events might unfold based on past events

Analysis close Interpretation of the news based on evidence, including data, as well as anticipating how events might unfold based on past events

President Trump may soon be the first president in American history to be impeached twice. But being impeached is not the same as being convicted and kicked out of office or barred from ever holding it again.

Here's how we got here, what's happening and what could happen next.

Can Trump even be impeached a second time? And what are the consequences if he is?

Yes, he can be.

The consequences are that he'll go down in history for being the first president to be impeached twice. If the Senate convicted him before he leaves office Jan. 20, he'd be removed, but as of now the Senate won't take it up before he leaves office. If it convicted him, the Senate could take another vote to bar him from ever holding office again.

Is there really time to impeach?

Yes. The impeachment process can be as long or as short, as detailed or not, as Congress wants it to be. The House is prepared to vote to impeach as soon as Wednesday. The Senate can hold a trial on whether to convict Trump even after his term ends, which is what seems likeliest to happen at this point.

Why is this happening?

Impeaching Trump in his final days in office was not on Congress's to-do list. But then Jan. 6 happened.

Congress convened under tense circumstances, after Trump's months-long quest to undermine the 2020 presidential election, contest his loss, and interfere in the counting of electoral votes and confirming that Joe Biden will be the next president.

Congress's role in who is president is largely a formality. But scores of Republican lawmakers, including a majority of GOP House members, planned to use an 1880s law governing the process to object to seating electors from swing states Trump lost. That's despite the…
Amber Phillips
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