What my biggest fuck-up as a developer taught me about taking ownership

thenextweb.com
3 min read
fairly easy
This article was originally published by Tomasz Łakomy on .cult by Honeypot, a Berlin-based community platform for developers. For the latest updates, follow .cult by Honeypot on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Linkedin and YouTube. Building software is what we — developers — are paid for. Unfortunately, more often than not we're also paid to break stuff. […]
This article was originally published by Tomasz Łakomy on .cult by Honeypot, a Berlin-based community platform for developers. For the latest updates, follow .cult by Honeypot on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Linkedin and YouTube.

Building software is what we — developers — are paid for.

Unfortunately, more often than not we're also paid to break stuff. Then, we get an "amazing" opportunity to fix what we've broken.

I don't think we talk enough about those stories.

Do you know how your Instagram feed is full of absolute highlights? Well, it's the same when it comes to developer horror stories. I've heard some which would make your skin crawl. It's funny though, we don't often share these stories.

I strongly believe there's a lesson to be learned from every 'fuckup.' And there's probably a funny story behind every odd rule your company has. "Why do we have a code freeze before major holidays?" — because Mike and Jenny had to spend their entire Christmas Eve migrating the database after a yolo-merge.

"Why can't I push directly to master? I know what I'm doing!" — sure, but one time Andrew wrote-off two weeks of work off the repo when he accidentally force pushed to master (I am not making this up, this actually happened in my career).

"Why is there a warning on my shirt telling me not to iron it when I'm wearing it? Who does this?" — you know the deal, it happened once, and now it's a continual…
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