White House paints Trump's meeting with Michigan legislators as routine

triblive.com
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WASHINGTON — The two Michigan state legislators headed to the White House on Friday to meet with President Donald Trump was nothing out of the ordinary, according to the administration. White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said Trump's meeting with the state legislators was "not an advocacy meeting" and insisted
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WASHINGTON — The two Michigan state legislators headed to the White House on Friday to meet with President Donald Trump was nothing out of the ordinary, according to the administration.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said Trump's meeting with the state legislators was "not an advocacy meeting" and insisted "he routinely meets with lawmakers from across the country."

Others have viewed the meeting as an extraordinary and sure-to-be futile attempt to block Joe Biden's victory in the battleground state and subvert the results of the 2020 presidential election.

The state has yet to certify its results for Biden, who won Michigan by more than 154,000 votes, according to unofficial results. Trump and his allies have been trying to convince judges and lawmakers in the state to set aside the popular vote and swap in Republican-chosen electors.

The president personally called two county canvass board officials earlier this week who had refused to certify the results in Wayne County, the state's most populous county and one that overwhelmingly favored Biden. The two GOP officials eventually agreed to certify the results, but following Trump's call, they later said they had second thoughts.

As he departed Detroit for Washington on Friday morning, state Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey was swarmed by activists bearing signs that read: "Respect the Vote" and "Protect Democracy." House Speaker Lee Chatfield was also headed to D.C., and protesters were expected in Washington, too.

AP

Some Michigan legislators have reported being deluged with calls and emails from Trump supporters demanding that they intervene. The House GOP caucus has prepared a 732-word stock response that pushes back, stating that state law clearly requires that electors be nominated by the party that wins the most votes.

"The law does not allow for…
Associated Press
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