Why companies that claim to be 'pro-climate' aren't pushing for Biden's climate plan

www.fastcompany.com
4 min read
fairly difficult
Companies like Google, Nike, PepsiCo, and Tesla are vocal about reducing their emissions and hitting the Paris Climate goals. But as the Build Back Better Act stalls in Congress, they're quiet—if not also supporting organizations lobbying to scuttle it.
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When Trump pulled the U.S. out of the Paris Climate Accords in 2017, companies like Google, Nike, Microsoft, and many others quickly made it clear that they thought it was a mistake. "We believe climate change is an urgent issue that demands global action," Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella tweeted at the time. But pro-climate companies have been slower to get behind the climate solutions in the Build Back Better Act, the currently pending legislation that would be the biggest step on climate ever taken by the U.S.—and something that climate advocates say should happen now to have a chance of avoiding the worst impacts of climate change.

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In a new ranking, the nonprofit ClimateVoice looked at 20 large American companies that another organization, InfluenceMap, calls "climate positive" because of their advocacy in the past. None of the companies are fully throwing their weight behind the Build Back Better Act pending in the budget bill, which includes measures to shift the country to clean power, incentivize electric vehicles and build charging stations, help retrofit homes, reduce the carbon footprint of agriculture, and more. The nonprofit considered whether companies had endorsed the climate provisions in the bill, whether they support the revenue provisions to pay for the climate policies, and whether they had publicly opposed the trade associations that are actively lobbying against the bill. Twelve of the companies haven't taken any of those three steps, the analysis found: 3M, Cisco Systems, Coca-Cola, Google, HP, J&J, McDonald's, Nike, PepsiCo, Pfizer, Qualcomm, and Tesla. Fast Company reached out to each of the companies for comment and several companies responded: Google pointed out that its VP of Government Affairs had tweeted in support of "pending legislative proposals that would invest in green tech innovation, modernize our power grid, promote public transit, and protect against…
Adele Peters
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