Why the United States dominates the Nobels

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No fewer than eight of this year's 13 Nobel winners were American citizens, extending a historic trend tied to the strength of US academia and its ability to attract top world talent.American universities consistently dominate "Global top 100" rankings, with a mix of private "Ivy Leagues" with lavis...
No fewer than eight of this year's 13 Nobel winners were American citizens, extending a historic trend tied to the strength of US academia and its ability to attract top world talent.

American universities consistently dominate "Global top 100" rankings, with a mix of private "Ivy Leagues" with lavish endowments and prestigious state colleges.

Since the first Nobels were awarded in 1901, the US has racked up 400 medals, followed by the United Kingdom with 138 and Germany with 111 -- these figures include people affiliated with multiple countries.

"I'm really appreciative of the opportunities that have been given to me in this country," Ardem Patapoutian, co-winner of the 2021 Nobel Medicine prize for his work on the nerve receptors related to touch, said of the United States at a press conference after his win.

The Armenian-American, who grew up in Lebanon, credited his success to the public-funded University of California system, where he received his bachelors and did his post-doc, as well as the Scripps Research Institute where he has been based for two decades.

The University of California is also home to his co-winner David Julius, of UC San Francisco. In all, UC staff and faculty have won 70 Nobels -- one shy of the total won by France, the fourth-leading country.

Basic research

This year's Physics Prize co-winner Syukuro Manabe, who left Japan in the 1950s and did his groundbreaking work on climate models at Princeton in New Jersey, told reporters that in America, he was able to go where his curiosity led him, which was key to his success.

Chemistry co-winner David…
Agence France-Presse
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