Askeia

Village in Cyprus
trends
MayJuneJulyAugustSeptemberOctober0500
alias
Asseia
coordinate location
latitude35.159
longitude33.608
precision0
population
19001920194019601k2k
2,734
point in time
1973
determination method
female population
1,399
male population
1,335
preferred
2,209
point in time
1960
determination method
female population
1,146
male population
1,063
2,041
point in time
1946
determination method
1,755
point in time
1931
determination method
female population
903
male population
852
1,676
point in time
1921
determination method
female population
823
male population
853
1,382
point in time
1911
determination method
female population
676
male population
706
1,173
point in time
1901
determination method
female population
549
male population
624
1,009
point in time
1891
determination method
female population
490
male population
519
989
point in time
1881
determination method
female population
484
male population
505
Wikipedia creation date
6/13/2009
Wikipedia incoming links count
Wikipedia opening text
Asha (Greek: Άσσια [locally [ˈaʃːa]]; Turkish: Paşaköy), also transliterated Assia, is a village in the Famagusta District of Cyprus, located 6 km northwest of Vatili. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Asha is located in the center of the Mesaoria valley. The village was recorded as early as the early 13th century in papal documents. Before 1974, the population of Asha was approximately 2,700. The village consisted of two parishes, St. John's and St. George's. The village had five churches: St. George, St. John Prodromos, St. Theodore, St. Spyridon and Virgin Mary. St. Spyridon was born in Asha and the church was built by Michael Kassialos, a folk artist from Asha. Asha was also well known for the craftsmanship of the embroidery made there. The main source of income in the area was farming and many agricultural products of Asha were sold to Nicosia's markets. Asha was also famous for its cucumbers. After years passed more Turks settled in the village and Greeks left then some Turks left and some Greeks came back and it was like that until 1960. So it was half Turkish half Greek after 1827 to 1960 then it was just Turkish.
Wikipedia redirect
Paşaköy, Famagusta
Askeia
Assia, Cyprus
Ashia
Wikipedia URL
Freebase ID
GeoNames ID
Heritage Gazetteer of Cyprus
Library of Congress authority ID
VIAF ID
Who's on First ID