Athens

Capital city of Greece
trends
MayJuneJulyAugustSeptemberOctober0500
inception
-7000-01-01T00:00:00Z
sourcing circumstances
official name
Αθήνα (greek)
native label
Αθήνα (greek)
demonym
атиня̀ни (bulgarian)
Atenano (esperanto)
Athenian (english)
coordinate location
latitude37.979
longitude23.716
precision0
spoken text audio
language of work or name
population
190019502000500k
664,046
point in time
2011
determination method
preferred
41,298
point in time
1861
determination method
30,969
point in time
1856
determination method
elevation above sea level
170 metre
area
39 square kilometre
postal code
10xxx, 11xxx, 120xx
official website
language of work or name
retrieved
May 18, 2017
collage image
nighttime view
media
local dialing code
210
Dewey Decimal Classification
2--49512
deprecated
licence plate code
BK
BM
BN
BP
HY
IA
IB
IE
IK
IM
IO
IP
IT
IX
IY
IZ
OA
TT
XE
XH
XP
XT
XX
XY
XZ
YA
YB
YE
YH
YZ
ZH
ZK
ZM
ZZ
Commons category
Athens
Commons gallery
Commons maps category
Maps of Athens
Wikimedia Commons URL
page banner
twinned administrative body
Wikinews URL
Wikipedia creation date
10/9/2001
Wikipedia incoming links count
Wikipedia opening text
Athens (/ˈæθɪnz/ ATH-inz; Greek: Αθήνα, romanized: Athína [aˈθina] (listen); Ancient Greek: Ἀθῆναι, romanized: Athênai (pl.) [atʰɛ̂ːnai̯]) is the capital and largest city of Greece. Athens dominates the Attica region and is one of the world's oldest cities, with its recorded history spanning over 3,400 years and its earliest human presence started somewhere between the 11th and 7th millennium BC. Classical Athens was a powerful city-state that emerged in conjunction with the seagoing development of the port of Piraeus. A center for the arts, learning and philosophy, home of Plato's Academy and Aristotle's Lyceum, it is widely referred to as the cradle of Western civilization and the birthplace of democracy, largely because of its cultural and political impact on the European continent, and in particular the Romans. In modern times, Athens is a large cosmopolitan metropolis and central to economic, financial, industrial, maritime, political and cultural life in Greece. Athens is a global city and one of the biggest economic centers in southeastern Europe. It has a large financial sector, and its port Piraeus is both the largest passenger port in Europe, and the second largest in the world. The Municipality of Athens (also City of Athens), which actually constitutes a small administrative unit of the entire city, had a population of 664,046 (in 2011) within its official limits, and a land area of 38.96 km2 (15.04 sq mi). The urban area of Athens (Greater Athens and Greater Piraeus) extends beyond its administrative municipal city limits, with a population of 3,090,508 (in 2011) over an area of 412 km2 (159 sq mi). According to Eurostat in 2011, the functional urban area (FUA) of Athens was the 9th most populous FUA in the European Union (the 6th most populous capital city of the EU), with a population of 3.8 million people. Athens is also the southernmost capital on the European mainland and the warmest major city in Europe. The heritage of the classical era is still evident in the city, represented by ancient monuments and works of art, the most famous of all being the Parthenon, considered a key landmark of early Western civilization. The city also retains Roman and Byzantine monuments, as well as a smaller number of Ottoman monuments. Athens is home to two UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the Acropolis of Athens and the medieval Daphni Monastery. Landmarks of the modern era, dating back to the establishment of Athens as the capital of the independent Greek state in 1834, include the Hellenic Parliament and the so-called "architectural trilogy of Athens", consisting of the National Library of Greece, the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and the Academy of Athens. Athens is also home to several museums and cultural institutions, such as the National Archeological Museum, featuring the world's largest collection of ancient Greek antiquities, the Acropolis Museum, the Museum of Cycladic Art, the Benaki Museum and the Byzantine and Christian Museum. Athens was the host city of the first modern-day Olympic Games in 1896, and 108 years later it welcomed home the 2004 Summer Olympics, making it one of only a handful of cities to have hosted the Olympics more than once.
Wikipedia redirect
Athens, Greece
Capital of Greece
Athenes
Athénes
Modern Athens
Greece Athens
Athenian
Athína
Athenians
GRATH
Athenai
Αθήνα
Ἀθῆναι
Athēnai
UN/LOCODE:GRATH
Travel athens
Athènes
Athens, Modern Diocese of
Gulf of Athens
Athens (Greece)
Museum of Engravings and Graphic Arts
Design Museum of the 20th Century
Museum of Children's Art in Plaka
Agrae
Atenás
Ionian Bank Museum of Graphic Arts
Athínai
Municipality of Athens
Atina, Greece
Athens Municipality
Атина
Athens (municipality)
Athina, Greece
Athence
City of Athens
Athenae
Geography of Athens
Transport in Athens
Transportation in Athens
Culture of Athens
Wikipedia URL
Wikiquote URL
Wikivoyage URL
archINFORM location ID
Bibliothèque nationale de France ID
Comic Vine ID