Dutch

West Germanic language
trends
MayJuneJulyAugustSeptemberOctober0500
alias
nl
Dutch language
nld
native label
Nederlands (dutch)
Hollands, Nederlands (dutch)
short name
нидерландский (russian)
нідерландська (ukrainian)
нідэрландская (belarusian)
холандски (serbian)
niderlandca (azerbaijani)
coordinate location
latitude52.5
longitude6
precision0
latitude50.75
longitude4.5
precision0
latitude51
longitude5.5
precision0
number of speakers
24,000,000
Wikimedia language code
nl
pronunciation audio
language of work or name
distribution map
media
Dewey Decimal Classification
439.31
Linguasphere code
52-ACB-a
exact match
Commons category
Dutch language
Commons gallery
Wikimedia Commons URL
page banner
Wikibooks URL
Wikipedia creation date
10/31/2001
Wikipedia incoming links count
Wikipedia opening text
Dutch (Nederlands (help·info)) is a West Germanic language spoken by around 24 million people as a first language and 5 million people as a second language, constituting the majority of people in the Netherlands (where it is the sole official language countrywide) and Belgium (as one of three official languages). It is the third-most-widely spoken Germanic language, after its close relatives English and German. Outside the Low Countries, it is the native language of the majority of the population of Suriname where it also holds an official status, as it does in Aruba, Curaçao and Sint Maarten, which are constituent countries of the Kingdom of the Netherlands located in the Caribbean. Historical linguistic minorities on the verge of extinction remain in parts of France and Germany, and in Indonesia, while up to half a million native speakers may reside in the United States, Canada and Australia combined. The Cape Dutch dialects of Southern Africa have evolved into Afrikaans, a mutually intelligible daughter language which is spoken to some degree by at least 16 million people, mainly in South Africa and Namibia. Dutch is one of the closest relatives of both German and English and is colloquially said to be "roughly in between" them. Dutch, like English, has not undergone the High German consonant shift, does not use Germanic umlaut as a grammatical marker, has largely abandoned the use of the subjunctive, and has levelled much of its morphology, including most of its case system. Features shared with German include the survival of two to three grammatical genders—albeit with few grammatical consequences—as well as the use of modal particles, final-obstruent devoicing, and a similar word order. Dutch vocabulary is mostly Germanic and incorporates slightly more Romance loans than German but far fewer than English. As with German, the vocabulary of Dutch also has strong similarities with the continental Scandinavian languages, but is not mutually intelligible in text or speech with any of them.
Wikipedia redirect
Dutch (language)
Netherlandic
Dutchophone
Words of Dutch origin
Dutch Language
Modern Dutch
Netherlandsish
Dutch speaking
Dutch-language
Dutch vocabulary
Netherlands language
Dutch-speaking area
Dutch-speaking world
High Dutch
Netherlandic language
Netherlandophone
ISO 639:nld
Dutch-speaking Europe
Dutch-speaking
ISO 639:nl
ISO 639:dut
Dutch word
Dutch in South Africa
Netherlandic Dutch
Batavophone
Early modern Dutch
Wikipedia URL
Wikisource URL
Wikivoyage URL
ABS ASCL 2011 code
1401
ASC Leiden Thesaurus ID
Australian Educational Vocabulary ID
Basisklassifikation
BNCF Thesaurus ID
Cultureel Woordenboek ID
Encyclopædia Britannica Online ID
Ethnologue.com language code
Freebase ID
Getty AAT ID
Glottolog code
GND ID
GOST 7.75–97 code
нид 495
Great Russian Encyclopedia Online ID
IAB code
1146
IETF language tag
nl
ISO 639-1 code
nl
ISO 639-2 code
applies to part
preferred
applies to part
ISO 639-3 code
Klexikon article ID
LoC and MARC vocabularies ID
National Diet Library Auth ID
OmegaWiki Defined Meaning
PSH ID
Quora topic ID
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external links