Disc Jockey

Person who plays recorded music for an audience
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alias
DJ
dee jay
Dj
female form of label
diskžokejka (czech)
disc jockey (french)
DJane (german)
די ג'יי (hebrew)
disc-jockey (asturian)
diskĵokeino (esperanto)
دي جيه (arabic)
male form of label
دي جي (arabic)
media
Commons category
Disc jockeys
Wikipedia creation date
10/22/2001
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Wikipedia opening text
A disc jockey, usually abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for a live audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJs, club DJs, who perform at a nightclub or music festival and turntablists who uses record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to gramophone records, but in the 2010s, DJ is used as an all-encompassing term to describe someone who mixes recorded music from any source, including cassettes, CDs or digital audio files on a CDJ or laptop. The title "DJ" is commonly used by DJs in front of their real names, adopted pseudonyms, or stage names. In the 2010s, it has become common for DJs to be featured as the credited artist on tracks they produced despite having a guest vocalist who performs the entire song, as with Marc Ronson's 2015 hit "Uptown Funk". DJs use audio equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs. Often, this involves aligning the beats of the music sources so their rhythms and tempos do not clash when played together and to enable a smooth transition from one song to another. DJs often use specialized DJ mixers, small audio mixers with crossfader and cue functions to blend or transition from one song to another. Mixers are also used to pre-listen to sources of recorded music in headphones and adjust upcoming tracks to mix with currently playing music. DJ software can be used with a DJ controller device to mix audio files on a computer instead of a console mixer. DJs may also use a microphone to speak to the audience; effects units such as reverb to create sound effects and electronic musical instruments such as drum machines and synthesizers.
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DJ
Disk jockey
D.J.
Disc Jockey
Radio DJ
Dee jaying
DJing
Dj
DJ's In Rock Group's
Dee-jay
Disc jockies
Disc-jockey
Dee jay
Disk jockeys
Indie DJ
Dee Jaying
Spinning (djing)
Timeline of events related to the disc jockey
Club DJ
Discaire
Disc-Jockey
DiscJockey
Tablist
Deejays
DeeJaying
DJ's
Selector (disc jockey)
Disk Jockey
Dj equipment
Discjockey
Club disc jockey
Disc Jokey
Djing Software
Funkmaster
Rock DJ (disc jockey)
Djs
DJs
D.j.
Radio deejay
D J
Urban Disc Jockey
Deejaying
DJ (music)
Deejay
Disc jockeys
Resident DJs
Resident DJ
Faking DJ
DJs who fake
DJs pretending
DJs pretending to mix
DJs faking mixing
DJ miming
Fake DJ
Pretend DJ
Faking DJs
Radio deejaying
DJ-ing
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