Turkish

Turkic language (possibly Altaic)
trends
JulyAugustSeptemberOctoberNovember0500
alias
Istanbul Turkish
Anatolian Turkish
Turkish language
tr
native label
Türkçe (turkish)
short name
турецкий (russian)
турецька (ukrainian)
türkcə (azerbaijani)
coordinate location
latitude39
longitude35
precision0
number of speakers
200620082010201275M
78,527,240
point in time
2012
applies to part
71,435,850
point in time
2006
applies to part
350,000
point in time
2006
applies to part
380,300
point in time
2006
applies to part
Wikimedia language code
tr
distribution map
media
Dewey Decimal Classification
494.35
Stack Exchange tag
Commons category
Turkish language
OSM tag or key
Key:language:tr
page banner
Wikibooks URL
Wikipedia creation date
4/20/2001
Wikipedia incoming links count
Wikipedia opening text
Turkish (Türkçe (help·info)), also referred to as Istanbul Turkish (İstanbul Türkçesi), and sometimes known as Turkey Turkish (Türkiye Türkçesi), is the most widely spoken of the Turkic languages, with around ten to fifteen million native speakers in Southeast Europe (mostly in East and Western Thrace) and sixty to sixty-five million native speakers in Western Asia (mostly in Anatolia). Outside Turkey, significant smaller groups of speakers exist in Germany, Austria, Bulgaria, North Macedonia, Northern Cyprus, Greece, the Caucasus, and other parts of Europe and Central Asia. Cyprus has requested that the European Union add Turkish as an official language, even though Turkey is not a member state. To the west, the influence of Ottoman Turkish—the variety of the Turkish language that was used as the administrative and literary language of the Ottoman Empire—spread as the Ottoman Empire expanded. In 1928, as one of Atatürk's Reforms in the early years of the Republic of Turkey, the Ottoman Turkish alphabet was replaced with a Latin alphabet. The distinctive characteristics of the Turkish language are vowel harmony and extensive agglutination. The basic word order of Turkish is subject–object–verb. Turkish has no noun classes or grammatical gender. The language makes usage of honorifics and has a strong T–V distinction which distinguishes varying levels of politeness, social distance, age, courtesy or familiarity toward the addressee. The plural second-person pronoun and verb forms are used referring to a single person out of respect.
Wikipedia redirect
Turkish (language)
Turkish Language
Türkçe
ISO 639:tur
Turcophone
Tuerkce
Turkce
Merhaba
ISO 639:tr
Turkey Turkish
Modern Turkish
Anatolian Turkish language
Anatolian Turkic language
Nuclear Turkish language
Turkish language reform
Istanbul Turkish
Modern Turkish language
History of the Turkish language
Modern standard Turkish
Turkosphere
Turkophonie
Turkophone
Turkish world
Wikipedia URL
Wikivoyage URL
ABS ASCL 2011 code
4301
Australian Educational Vocabulary ID
BabelNet ID
Bashkir encyclopedia (Russian version) ID
Biblioteca Nacional de España ID
Bibliothèque nationale de France ID
BNCF Thesaurus ID
Brockhaus Enzyklopädie online ID
Encyclopædia Britannica Online ID
Ethnologue.com language code
Freebase ID
Glottolog code
GND ID
GOST 7.75–97 code
тур 693
Great Russian Encyclopedia Online ID
IAB code
1195
IETF language tag
tr
ISO 639-1 code
tr
ISO 639-2 code
ISO 639-3 code
Klexikon article ID
Library of Congress authority ID
LoC and MARC vocabularies ID
National Diet Library Auth ID
OmegaWiki Defined Meaning
Quora topic ID
UNESCO Thesaurus ID
WALS lect code
external links