Animal

Kingdom of multicellular eukaryotic organisms
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alias
Animalia
Metazoa
animals
taxon name
Animalia
taxon author
year of taxon name publication
1758
taxon common name
动物界 (chinese)
pronunciation audio
language of work or name
language of work or name
language of work or name
collage image
media
Dewey Decimal Classification
590
equivalent class
described at URL
retrieved
June 11, 2015
properties for this type
gait
earliest date
-670000000-01-01T00:00:00Z
Commons category
Animalia
Unicode range
U+1F400-1F43D
Wikipedia creation date
3/29/2001
Wikipedia incoming links count
Wikipedia opening text
Animals are multicellular eukaryotic organisms that form the biological kingdom Animalia. With few exceptions, animals consume organic material, breathe oxygen, are able to move, can reproduce sexually, and grow from a hollow sphere of cells, the blastula, during embryonic development. Over 1.5 million living animal species have been described—of which around 1 million are insects—but it has been estimated there are over 7 million animal species in total. Animals range in length from 8.5 millionths of a metre to 33.6 metres (110 ft). They have complex interactions with each other and their environments, forming intricate food webs. The kingdom Animalia includes humans, but in colloquial use the term animal often refers only to non-human animals. The study of non-human animals is known as zoology. Most living animal species are in the Bilateria, a clade whose members have a bilaterally symmetric body plan. The Bilateria include the protostomes—in which many groups of invertebrates are found, such as nematodes, arthropods, and molluscs—and the deuterostomes, containing both the echinoderms as well as the chordates, the latter containing the vertebrates. Life forms interpreted as early animals were present in the Ediacaran biota of the late Precambrian. Many modern animal phyla became clearly established in the fossil record as marine species during the Cambrian explosion, which began around 542 million years ago. 6,331 groups of genes common to all living animals have been identified; these may have arisen from a single common ancestor that lived 650 million years ago. Historically, Aristotle divided animals into those with blood and those without. Carl Linnaeus created the first hierarchical biological classification for animals in 1758 with his Systema Naturae, which Jean-Baptiste Lamarck expanded into 14 phyla by 1809. In 1874, Ernst Haeckel divided the animal kingdom into the multicellular Metazoa (synonymous for Animalia) and the Protozoa, single-celled organisms no longer considered animals. In modern times, the biological classification of animals relies on advanced techniques, such as molecular phylogenetics, which are effective at demonstrating the evolutionary relationships between animal taxa. Humans make use of many other animal species, such as for food (including meat, milk, and eggs), for materials (such as leather and wool), and also as pets, and for transports, as working animals. Dogs have been used in hunting, while many terrestrial and aquatic animals were hunted for sports. Non-human animals have appeared in art from the earliest times and are featured in mythology and religion.
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KingdomAnimalia
Metazoa
Metazoan
Kingdom Animalia
Anumal
Animalia Kingdom
Animals
Animal (Metazoan) Evolution
Water animal
Animalia
Metazoans
Kingdom animalia
Non-human animal
Anamalia
Animal Phylogeny
Metazoon
Animal Characteristics
Animal phylum
Kingdom animal
Animal types
Kingdom Animal
Animal life
Metazoic
Animal body
New Animal Phylogeny
New animal phylogeny
Animal reproduction
Classification of animals
Basal metazoa
Basal metazoan
Metazoan life
Animal phylogeny
Animals versus humans
Animal (biology)
Individual animals
Wikipedia URL
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1000001
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mapping relation type
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external links