Taxon

Group of one or more organism(s), which a taxonomist adjudges to be a unit
trends
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media
Wikidata property
parent_taxon
equivalent class
described at URL
retrieved
June 16, 2015
properties for this type
parent_taxon
taxon_rank
taxon_name
taxon_range_map_image
ex_taxon_author
taxon_author
minimum_viable_temperature
optimum_viable_temperature
maximum_viable_temperature
main_food_source
habitat
taxonomic_type
incertae_sedis
hymenium_type
code_of_nomenclature
taxon_common_name
has_natural_reservoir
natural_reservoir_of
this_taxon_is_source_of
bradley_and_fletcher_checklist_number
nomenclatural_status
species_profile_and_threats_database_id
gram_staining
arkive_id
inaturalist_taxon_id
host
nederlands_soortenregister_id
has_fruit_type
endemic_to
OSM tag or key
Key:taxon
Wikipedia creation date
3/21/2003
Wikipedia incoming links count
Wikipedia opening text
In biology, a taxon (plural taxa; back-formation from taxonomy) is a group of one or more populations of an organism or organisms seen by taxonomists to form a unit. Although neither is required, a taxon is usually known by a particular name and given a particular ranking, especially if and when it is accepted or becomes established. It is not uncommon, however, for taxonomists to remain at odds over what belongs to a taxon and the criteria used for inclusion. If a taxon is given a formal scientific name, its use is then governed by one of the nomenclature codes specifying which scientific name is correct for a particular grouping. Initial attempts at classifying and ordering organisms (plants and animals) were set forth in Linnaeus's system in Systema Naturae, 10th edition, (1758) as well as an unpublished work by Bernard and Antoine Laurent de Jussieu. The idea of a unit-based system of biological classification was first made widely available in 1805 in the introduction of Jean-Baptiste Lamarck's Flore françoise, of Augustin Pyramus de Candolle's Principes élémentaires de botanique. Lamarck set out a system for the "natural classification" of plants. Since then, systematists continue to construct accurate classifications encompassing the diversity of life; today, a "good" or "useful" taxon is commonly taken to be one that reflects evolutionary relationships. Many modern systematists, such as advocates of phylogenetic nomenclature, use cladistic methods that require taxa to be monophyletic (all descendants of some ancestor). Their basic unit, therefore, is the clade rather than the taxon. Similarly, among those contemporary taxonomists working with the traditional Linnean (binomial) nomenclature, few propose taxa they know to be paraphyletic. An example of a well-established taxon that is not also a clade is the class Reptilia, the reptiles; birds are descendants of reptiles but are not included in the Reptilia.Birds are included in the Aves.
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Taxa
Subtaxon
Supertaxon
Taxum
Fish taxa
Taxonomic group
Polytypic taxon
Taxxon
Taxon (biology)
Taxons
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