Archaeology

Study of human past through material culture
trends
December2021FebruaryMarchAprilMay0500
alias
excavation
archeology
archæology
Archaeology
spoken text audio
language of work or name
media
Dewey Decimal Classification
930.1
exact match
Commons category
Archaeology
Commons gallery
Wikimedia Commons URL
Wikibooks URL
Wikinews URL
Wikipedia creation date
11/3/2001
Wikipedia incoming links count
Wikipedia opening text
Archaeology, or archeology, is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts and cultural landscapes. Archaeology can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities. In Europe it is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines, while in North America archaeology is a sub-field of anthropology. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history, from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi in East Africa 3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology is distinct from palaeontology, which is the study of fossil remains. It is particularly important for learning about prehistoric societies, for whom there may be no written records to study. Prehistory includes over 99% of the human past, from the Paleolithic until the advent of literacy in societies across the world. Archaeology has various goals, which range from understanding culture history to reconstructing past lifeways to documenting and explaining changes in human societies through time. The discipline involves surveying, excavation and eventually analysis of data collected to learn more about the past. In broad scope, archaeology relies on cross-disciplinary research. It draws upon anthropology, history, art history, classics, ethnology, geography, geology, literary history, linguistics, semiology, sociology, textual criticism, physics, information sciences, chemistry, statistics, paleoecology, paleography, paleontology, paleozoology, and paleobotany.[citation needed] Archaeology developed out of antiquarianism in Europe during the 19th century, and has since become a discipline practiced across the world. Archaeology has been used by nation-states to create particular visions of the past. Since its early development, various specific sub-disciplines of archaeology have developed, including maritime archaeology, feminist archaeology and archaeoastronomy, and numerous different scientific techniques have been developed to aid archaeological investigation. Nonetheless, today, archaeologists face many problems, such as dealing with pseudoarchaeology, the looting of artifacts, a lack of public interest, and opposition to the excavation of human remains.
Wikipedia redirect
Archaeologist
Archeology
Archaeological
Archeologist
Archeologists
Archeological
Archaeologists
Archæology
Archaelogical
Excavations, Archaeological
Archaelogists
Conservation Archeology
Cover stone
Arheological
Archaelogy
Archaelology
Archeaologist
Archaeologically
Archæologist
Coverstone
Field archaeology
Wikipedia URL
Wikiquote URL
ASC Leiden Thesaurus ID
BabelNet ID
Banglapedia (Bengali version) ID
Banglapedia (English version) ID
Bashkir encyclopedia (Bashkir version) ID
Bashkir encyclopedia (Russian version) ID
Basisklassifikation
BDCYL authority ID
Biblioteca Nacional de España ID
Bibliothèque nationale de France ID
BNCF Thesaurus ID
Comic Vine ID
Cultureel Woordenboek ID
Dizionario di Storia Treccani ID
Encyclopædia Britannica Online ID
Encyclopedia of Modern Ukraine ID
Freebase ID
Getty AAT ID
Giant Bomb ID
GND ID
Great Russian Encyclopedia Online ID
Guardian topic ID
HDS ID
IPTC NewsCode
Joconde domain ID
JSTOR topic ID
Klexikon article ID
Library of Congress authority ID
Maine: An Encyclopedia ID
MeSH descriptor ID
National Diet Library Auth ID
NE.se ID
NKCR AUT ID
OmegaWiki Defined Meaning
Orthodox Encyclopedia ID
PACTOLS thesaurus ID
PhilPapers topic
PSH ID
Quora topic ID
subreddit
language of work or name
number of subscribers
43,848
UNESCO Thesaurus ID
US National Archives Identifier
YSO ID
external links