Fictional Character

Fictional human or non-human character in a narrative work of arts
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alias
fictitious character
character
media
Wikidata property
narrative_age
characters
equivalent class
described at URL
retrieved
June 11, 2015
properties for this type
sex_or_gender
occupation
family_name
given_name
creator
performer
first_appearance
present_in_work
date_of_birth
date_of_death
place_of_birth
place_of_death
cause_of_death
Commons category
Fictional characters
Wikipedia creation date
8/27/2002
Wikipedia incoming links count
Wikipedia opening text
In fiction, a character (sometimes known as a fictional character) is a person or other being in a narrative (such as a novel, play, television series, film, or video game). The character may be entirely fictional or based on a real-life person, in which case the distinction of a "fictional" versus "real" character may be made. Derived from the ancient Greek word χαρακτήρ, the English word dates from the Restoration, although it became widely used after its appearance in Tom Jones in 1749. From this, the sense of "a part played by an actor" developed. Character, particularly when enacted by an actor in the theatre or cinema, involves "the illusion of being a human person". In literature, characters guide readers through their stories, helping them to understand plots and ponder themes. Since the end of the 18th century, the phrase "in character" has been used to describe an effective impersonation by an actor. Since the 19th century, the art of creating characters, as practiced by actors or writers, has been called characterisation. A character who stands as a representative of a particular class or group of people is known as a type. Types include both stock characters and those that are more fully individualised. The characters in Henrik Ibsen's Hedda Gabler (1891) and August Strindberg's Miss Julie (1888), for example, are representative of specific positions in the social relations of class and gender, such that the conflicts between the characters reveal ideological conflicts. The study of a character requires an analysis of its relations with all of the other characters in the work. The individual status of a character is defined through the network of oppositions (proairetic, pragmatic, linguistic, proxemic) that it forms with the other characters. The relation between characters and the action of the story shifts historically, often miming shifts in society and its ideas about human individuality, self-determination, and the social order.
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Cartoon character
Fictional charactor
Fictional characters
Major character
Cartoon characters
Computer game character
Role (actor)
Role (performing arts)
Secondary character
Fictional monster
Video game characters
Dynamic character
Flat character
Flat and Round Characters
Literary character
Subordinate character
Round character
Fictional people
Regular character
Regular characters
Character (fiction)
Static character
Static characters
Dynamic characters
Pseudo-character
Fictional character
Original character
Mr. ask
Hellene Devil Girl from Hell
Risal Singh Ahir
Charly Putoznwschvtzky
Fiction character
Tijolinho
Tijolinho (character)
Prince Kravik
Guest character
Ongoing character
Series regular
Film role
Fictional role
Fiction role
Role (fiction)
Fictional group
Očets people
Wikipedia URL
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BNCF Thesaurus ID
Freebase ID
GND ID
Gran Enciclopèdia Catalana ID
Great Russian Encyclopedia Online ID
National Diet Library Auth ID
PhilPapers topic
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Thesaurus For Graphic Materials ID
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external links