Version, Edition, or Translation

Specific version of a work, resulting from its edition, adaptation, or translation; set of substantially similar copies of a work
trends
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alias
edition
version
expression
manifestation
translation
adaptation
media
Wikidata property
edition_or_translation_of
has_edition
properties for this type
edition_or_translation_of
translator
isbn_10
isbn_13
edition_number
place_of_publication
publisher
publication_date
google_books_id
wikisource_index_page
riss_catalog
scanned_file_on_wikimedia_commons
number_of_pages
part_of_the_series
czech_national_bibliography_book_id
author_of_afterword
author_of_foreword
Wikipedia creation date
4/21/2004
Wikipedia incoming links count
Wikipedia opening text
The bibliographical definition of an edition includes all copies of a book printed “from substantially the same setting of type,” including all minor typographical variants. The numbering of book editions is a special case of the wider field of revision control. The traditional conventions for numbering book editions evolved spontaneously for several centuries before any greater applied science of revision control became important to humanity, which did not occur until the era of widespread computing had arrived (when software and electronic publishing came into existence). The old and new aspects of book edition numbering (from before and since the advent of computing) are discussed below.
Wikipedia redirect
Print run
Press run
Printing run
First Edition
First edition
Published edition
Impression (publishing)
Impression (books)
Edition (books)
Impression (book)
1st edition
1st Edition
Republication
Republished
Republish
Printing (edition)
Printing (issue)
Printing (batch)
Printing (run)
Edition, with large additions
Definitive edition
First edition, thus
1st edition, thus
First thus
1st thus
Wikipedia URL
BabelNet ID
Getty AAT ID