"Soon to be Revealed" --Hidden Galaxies of the Early Universe | The Daily Galaxy

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"Hubble simply doesn't go far enough into the infrared" to see the hidden galaxies of the early universe, said Rogier Windhorst of Arizona State University, co-author of a new study using the near-infrared capabilities of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to probe known quasars, 'quasi-stellar radio sources',  in hopes of spotting the surrounding glow […]
"Hubble simply doesn't go far enough into the infrared" to see the hidden galaxies of the early universe, said Rogier Windhorst of Arizona State University, co-author of a new study using the near-infrared capabilities of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to probe known quasars, 'quasi-stellar radio sources', in hopes of spotting the surrounding glow of their host galaxies, without significant detections, suggesting that cocoons of dust that absorb visible light within the galaxies is obscuring the light of their stars.

Unlocking Secrets of the Infrared Universe

"We want to know what kind of galaxies these quasars live in. That can help us answer questions like: How can black holes grow so big so fast? Is there a relationship between the mass of the galaxy and the mass of the black hole, like we see in the nearby universe?" said lead author Madeline Marshall of the University of Melbourne in Australia, who conducted her work within the ARC Centre of Excellence in All Sky Astrophysics in 3 Dimensions.

The new study suggests that NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, set to launch in 2021, will be able to reveal the hidden host galaxies of some distant quasars despite their small sizes and obscuring dust. using the Webb's infrared detectors. The more distant a galaxy is, the more its light has been stretched to longer wavelengths by the expansion of the universe with ultraviolet light from the black hole's accretion disk or the galaxy's young stars shifted to infrared wavelengths. "Webb will open up the opportunity to observe these very distant host galaxies for the first time," said Marshal.

Webb will primarily look at the Universe in the infrared, while Hubble studies it primarily at optical and ultraviolet wavelengths (though it has some infrared capability). Webb also has a much bigger mirror than Hubble, which means that Webb can peer farther back into time than Hubble is capable of doing. Hubble is in a very close orbit around the earth, while Webb will be 1.5…
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