Latin

Almost extinct Indo-European language of the Italic family
trends
JulyAugustSeptemberOctoberNovemberDecember0500
alias
Latin language
la
lat
native label
Lingua latina (latin)
short name
латынь (russian)
латина (ukrainian)
Latin (english)
łacina (polish)
latınca (azerbaijani)
лотинӣ (tajik)
spoken text audio
language of work or name
number of speakers
100
point in time
2013
applies to part
0
applies to part
Wikimedia language code
la
media
Dewey Decimal Classification
470
ISOCAT id
774
exact match
Commons category
Latin language
Commons gallery
Wikimedia Commons URL
Wikibooks URL
Wikipedia creation date
10/18/2001
Wikipedia incoming links count
Wikipedia opening text
Latin (Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin was originally spoken in the area around Rome, known as Latium. Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language in Italy, and subsequently throughout the western Roman Empire. Latin has contributed many words to the English language. In particular, Latin (and Ancient Greek) roots are used in English descriptions of theology, the sciences, medicine, and law. By the late Roman Republic (75 BC), Old Latin had been standardised into Classical Latin. Vulgar Latin was the colloquial form spoken during the same time and attested in inscriptions and the works of comic playwrights like Plautus and Terence and author Petronius. Late Latin is the written language from the 3rd century and the colloquial form Vulgar Latin developed into the Romance languages, such as French, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan and Spanish in the 6th to 9th centuries. Medieval Latin was used as a literary language from the 9th century to the Renaissance which used Renaissance Latin. Later, Early Modern Latin and New Latin evolved. Latin was used as the language of international communication, scholarship and science until well into the 18th century, when it began to be supplanted by vernaculars (including the Romance languages). Ecclesiastical Latin remains the official language of the Holy See and the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church. Latin is a highly inflected language, with three distinct genders, up to seven noun cases, five declensions, four verb conjugations, six tenses, three persons, three moods, two voices, two or three aspects and two numbers.
Wikipedia redirect
Latin (language)
Latin language
Latinate
Latin Language
Lingua latina
Lingua Latina
Lingua Latīna
ISO 639:lat
ISO 639:la
Latin-language
Latin/Archive 2
Volgare
Wikipedia URL
Wikiquote URL
Wikiversity URL
ABS ASCL 2011 code
2902
Australian Educational Vocabulary ID
BabelNet ID
Basisklassifikation
BNCF Thesaurus ID
Brockhaus Enzyklopädie online ID
Encyclopædia Britannica Online ID
Encyclopædia Universalis ID
Encyclopedia of Modern Ukraine ID
Ethnologue.com language code
Freebase ID
Getty AAT ID
Glottolog code
GND ID
GOST 7.75–97 code
лат 380
Great Russian Encyclopedia Online ID
HDS ID
IAB code
1122
IETF language tag
la
ISO 639-1 code
la
ISO 639-2 code
ISO 639-3 code
Klexikon article ID
Library of Congress authority ID
LoC and MARC vocabularies ID
National Diet Library Auth ID
OmegaWiki Defined Meaning
PACTOLS thesaurus ID
PSH ID
Quora topic ID
Store norske leksikon ID
mapping relation type
UNESCO Thesaurus ID
external links