Apple

Fruit of the apple tree
trends
JuneJulyAugustSeptemberOctober0500
alias
apples
pronunciation audio
language of work or name
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total produced
20102012201420165G10G
11,273,000,000 pound
point in time
2016
40,924,707 tonne
point in time
2014
3,195,299 tonne
point in time
2014
country
2,497,680 tonne
point in time
2014
country
2,480,444 tonne
point in time
2014
country
2,473,608 tonne
point in time
2014
country
1,757,225 tonne
point in time
2014
country
1,624,000 tonne
point in time
2014
country
1,572,844 tonne
point in time
2014
country
1,531,625 tonne
point in time
2014
country
5,550,006,000 pound
point in time
2010
located in the administrative territorial entity
1,269,996,000 pound
point in time
2010
located in the administrative territorial entity
590,016,000 pound
point in time
2010
located in the administrative territorial entity
491,988,000 pound
point in time
2010
located in the administrative territorial entity
280,014,000 pound
point in time
2010
located in the administrative territorial entity
sectional view
media
Dewey Decimal Classification
634.11
Unicode character
🍎
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Commons category
Apples
Commons gallery
Wikimedia Commons URL
Wikibooks URL
Wikipedia creation date
10/24/2001
Wikipedia incoming links count
Wikipedia opening text
An apple is a sweet, edible fruit produced by an apple tree (Malus domestica). Apple trees are cultivated worldwide and are the most widely grown species in the genus Malus. The tree originated in Central Asia, where its wild ancestor, Malus sieversii, is still found today. Apples have been grown for thousands of years in Asia and Europe and were brought to North America by European colonists. Apples have religious and mythological significance in many cultures, including Norse, Greek and European Christian tradition. Apple trees are large if grown from seed. Generally, apple cultivars are propagated by grafting onto rootstocks, which control the size of the resulting tree. There are more than 7,500 known cultivars of apples, resulting in a range of desired characteristics. Different cultivars are bred for various tastes and use, including cooking, eating raw and cider production. Trees and fruit are prone to a number of fungal, bacterial and pest problems, which can be controlled by a number of organic and non-organic means. In 2010, the fruit's genome was sequenced as part of research on disease control and selective breeding in apple production. Worldwide production of apples in 2017 was 83.1 million tonnes, with China accounting for half of the total.
Wikipedia redirect
Nutritional information about the apple
Apple (tree)
Apple/Nutritional information
Apple tree
Apples
Apple (Fruit)
Malus domestica
Apple Popularity
Aplle
Culture of apple
Apple trees
Apple-tree
Apple blossoms
Apple blossom
Apple (fruit)
Dried apple
Apfelbäume
Apfelbaume
Malus domesticus
🍎
🍏
Apple production
Malus pumila
Malus communis
Pyrus malus
Apple peel
Apple core
Malus ×domestica
Apple Trees
Malus × domestica
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GS1 Global Product Classification brick code
10005900
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Klexikon article ID
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National Diet Library Auth ID
New Georgia Encyclopedia ID
OmegaWiki Defined Meaning
Open Food Facts food category ID
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